Greenway System of trails in Asheville NC

Parks, Recreation & Cultural Arts

Parks - Greenways

The City of Asheville is in the formative stages of developing a greenway system that weaves throughout the community. 


Greenways are corridors of protected open space for conservation and recreation. Asheville's greenway system is growing and will eventually offer a minimum of 14 corridors and 29 miles of trails connecting the places where people work, live and play.

 

Contact Information
Asheville Parks, Recreation & Cultural Arts Department
70 Court Plaza, Asheville, NC 28801
Phone:(828)259-5800
Fax:(828)259-5606

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Asheville’s varied topography and vegetation affords a variety of experiences for the greenway trail users.  Presently, the corridors are often located along creeks or along the Swannanoa and French Broad Rivers although mountainous trails are in the planning process.  These greenway trails have been designed to be handicap accessible and connect neighborhoods with nearby destinations such as parks and schools.

The Asheville Parks, Recreation, Cultural Arts and Greenways Master Plan was approved in 2009 and included a map of recommended greenways.


Greenway Commission
The Greenway Commission is made up of community volunteers charged with the mission to advise the City of Asheville in developing a comprehensive system of greenways. The Greenway Commission meets the second Thursday of each month at 3:30 p.m., in the 1st floor conference room of City Hall. For more information call 259-5800.


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Completed Greenways

Greenways Under Development

Proposed Greenways

  • French Broad River Greenway
  • Glenn’s Creek (UNCA)
  • Reed Creek Phase 1
  • Riverbend
  • Reed Creek Phase 2
  • Town Branch Greenway- Phase 1
  • Beaucatcher Mountain Greenway
  • Clingman Forest Greenway
  • Haw Creek Greenway
  • Hominy Creek Greenway
  • Montford Greenway
  • Rhododendron Creek Greenway
  • Swannanoa River Greenway

 

 

 

 

 

 


Completed Greenways

French Broad River Greenway
This roughly 2.5-mile French Broad River Greenway system is Asheville's major north-south alternative transportation corridor and overlaps with a portion of the Wilma Dykeman RiverWay Plan, a major urban waterfront redevelopment project.
The Dykeman plan calls for a 10’ wide greenway trail along Riverside Drive, Lyman Street, Meadow Street and Swannanoa River Road. The trail will be separated from the road by a grass strip and will at times meander in and out of various riverfront parks. It connects a series of proposed riverfront parks on Riverside Drive and the River Arts District to the Amboy Road river park system and West Asheville to the River Arts District.

Glenns Creek Greenway
This trail extends from Weaver Park to the Botanical Gardens of UNC-Asheville for a length of one mile. It is a paved trail mostly 10’ wide and connects the Norwood, Montford and University neighborhoods. This greenway is completed except for a short section begins at Weaver Park and ends at Kimberly Avenue where an on-road greenway is proposed. The greenway is proposed along the creek, in an existing sewer right-of-way, and in close proximity to residences on both east and west sides of Glenns Creek.

Reed Creek Greenway
The Reed Creek Greenway is Asheville’s highest profile greenway. It stretches from W.T. Weaver Blvd. to Starnes Avenue, parallel to Broadway Avenue. The southern segment is broken into various phases totaling 1.0 miles, more than half of which are completed or fully funded or under development. The last phase of the southern segment will stretch from Magnolia Avenue to Starnes Avenue. The trail will meander along the bank of Reed Creek and hug the back property lines of high-density residential and commercial developments. The corridor is wooded and has an urban feel due to its close proximity to Broadway Avenue and the Montford neighborhood. It will connect to Glenn’s Creek Greenway, UNC-Asheville, the future Health Adventure facility and the Montford neighborhood to downtown Asheville. Greenway will also connect into the high density residential and commercial developments that are proposed along Broadway Avenue as part of the neighborhood corridor district re-zoning.

Swannanoa River Greenway (Riverbend)
The Swannanoa River Greenway system is Asheville’s major east-west alternative transportation corridor and overlaps with a portion of the Dykeman Plan that calls for greenway trail along Riverside Drive, Lyman Street, Meadow Road and Swannanoa River Road. The trail will be separated from the road by a grass strip and will at times meander in and out of open space parks. A portion of the greenway is completed at Riverbend Park in front of the Wal-Mart shopping center.


Greenways Under Development

Reed Creek Greenway
The Reed Creek Greenway is Asheville’s highest profile greenway. It stretches from W.T. Weaver Blvd. to Starnes Avenue, parallel to Broadway Avenue. The southern segment is broken into various phases totaling 1.0 miles, more than half of which are completed or fully funded or under development. The last phase of the southern segment will stretch from Magnolia Avenue to Starnes Avenue. The trail will meander along the bank of Reed Creek and hug the back property lines of high-density residential and commercial developments. The corridor is wooded and has an urban feel due to its close proximity to Broadway Avenue and the Montford neighborhood. It will connect to Glenn’s Creek Greenway, UNC-Asheville, the future Health Adventure facility and the Montford neighborhood to downtown Asheville. Greenway will also connect into the high density residential and commercial developments that are proposed along Broadway Avenue as part of the neighborhood corridor district re-zoning.

Town Branch Creek Greenway
Begins at Choctaw Park, 500 feet west from the intersection with McDowell Street, travels west along Town Branch Creek and ends near the northern tip of Livingston Street Park. The entire corridor falls within City-owned land and portions of it are under construction. This section provides connections to the Asheland Avenue bike lane (future), Choctaw Park, Livingston Street Park, transit system, and public housing areas.


Proposed Greenways

BeaucatcherMountain Greenway
This corridor begins at Memorial Stadium, travels north along the west slope of Beaucatcher Mountain to College Street. The corridor ends at the old Beaucatcher reservoir. This wooded corridor will have commanding views of downtown Asheville and connects Beaucatcher Park and White Fawn Reservoir. The greenway will be a paved asphalt trail with brief on-road segments in the form of bike lanes and/or sidewalks. This corridor will connect Beaucatcher Park and White Fawn Reservoir to the old Beaucatcher Reservoir near the intersection of College Street and Windswept Drive. There are potential connections to Memorial Stadium/Mountainside Park, McCormick Field and the Asheland Avenue greenway corridor.

Beverly HillsGreenway
This greenway winds itself through the rolling and beautifully wooded Beverly Hills neighborhood that was developed around a notable Donald Ross golf course. This segment would connect the Haw Creek Greenway to the Swannanoa River Greenway via Ann Patton Joyce Park and the Asheville Municipal Golf Course and new neighborhood sidewalks.

ClingmanForest Greenway
This wooded corridor begins at Aston Park at Hilliard Avenue and follows an existing sewer line and stream down to Clingman Avenue. There are potential connections to Aston Park, Asheville Middle School, YWCA, future affordable housing complex at the corner of Hilliard and Clingman Avenue, Owens Bell Park and surrounding residential areas.

Hominy Creek Greenway
The Hominy Creek Greenway is a fundamental corridor that will link the West Asheville community to the French Broad River Greenway system. It is approximately 2.6 miles long. It begins at Hominy Creek Park (Buncombe County facility) located on the west bank of the French Broad River, travels north on-road along Hominy Creek Road, crosses the road near the transfer station entrance and winds northwest along Hominy Creek, below the I-40 West, Brevard Road, and I-240 West overpasses. This section ends at the old Brevard Road bridge and the Waller property, a large track of land under option by the Trust for Public Land. Potential connections to the Farmers Market and the North Carolina National Guard (slated for re-development by the City of Asheville). The majority of land is publicly controlled.

The corridor continues near the old Brevard Road bridge, winds west along Hominy Creek through the Waller Tract, crosses Bear Creek Road, continues to follow the creek until it bends at I-40 West and then heads west away from the creek to Sand Hill Road. There is an option to have a second trail run along the opposite side of Hominy Creek from the Waller Tract, but it would require a significant easement from the West Asheville Assembly of God Church. This section has potential connections to numerous residential areas and existing sidewalk systems. The beginning of the corridor offers a direct connection to the Rhododendron Creek Greenway.

Haw Creek Greenway
The section of greenway will link into the proposed bike lane and sidewalk facilities on New Haw Creek Road. It will connect East Asheville Center and East Asheville Park to New Haw Creek Road and Haw Creek Elementary School.

Montford Greenway
This cooridor begins at Gudger Street below the Area Chamber of Commerce Visitors Center and Randolph Learning Center and follows an existing sewer line and stream down to Hill Street. The section continues west along Hill Street underneath I-26 and ends at Riverside Drive. Portions of the greenway have challenging terrain. Potential connections to Isaac Dickson Elementary School, Randolph Learning Center, Chamber of Commerce, public housing, residential areas and the Wilma Dykeman RiverWay.

Rhododendron Creek Greenway
This corridor begins at Shelburne Road directly across the street from the North Carolina National Guard property and becomes a shared road with Talmadge Street. At West Asheville Park the greenway goes off-road, runs behind the Davenport co-housing development for which an easement has been granted to the City, heads northwest and ends at Sand Hill Road near Vance Elementary School. This section will increase greenway access for a significant amount of residential area, West Asheville Park, and indirectly utilizing the existing sidewalk system to Vance Elementary School.

SwannanoaRiver Greenway (Riverbend)
The Swannanoa River Greenway system is Asheville’s major east-west alternative transportation corridor and overlaps with a portion of the Dykeman Plan that calls for greenway trail along Riverside Drive, Lyman Street, Meadow Road and Swannanoa River Road. The trail will be separated from the road by a grass strip and will at times meander in and out of open space parks. A portion of the greenway is completed at Riverbend Park in front of the Wal-Mart shopping center.

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